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Easy charging, easy driving with this questionnaire

Whether you own an electric vehicle or not, your opinion counts! The European-funded project eCharge4Drivers has launched a set of questionnaires to gather the input from taxi drivers, private users and logistics services to contribute to the research on smart mobility and help the project to design new, more convenient charging systems across Europe.

The deadline to submit your contribution is 12 February 2021.

The survey covers each of the six urban area sites and four TEN-T corridors.

The survey for the (light) electric vehicle owners takes about 15-20 minutes. This survey consists of 4 parts: a first part about your socio-demographic profile, a second part about your mobility and parking behaviour, a third part about your charging behavior, and a last part about the acceptance of new charging options.

The survey for the (Light) Electric Vehicle owners takes about 15-20 minutes. This survey consists of 4 parts: a first part about your socio-demographic profile, a second part about your mobility and parking behaviour, a third part about your charging behavior, and a last part about the acceptance of new charging options.

The survey for the non-electric vehicle owners takes about 5 minutes. This survey consists of 3 parts: a first part about your socio-demographic profile, a second part about your mobility and parking behaviour, and a last part about your intention to purchase an (L)EV.

Click here to take the questionnaires.

Whether you own an electric vehicle or not, your opinion counts! The European-funded project eCharge4Drivers has launched a set of questionnaires to gather the input from taxi drivers, private users and logistics services to contribute to the research on smart mobility and help the project to design new, more convenient charging systems across Europe. The deadline to […]

Renault sign partnership agreement to test the charging of electric vehicles

Renault has signed a partnership agreement together with RTE (Réseau de Transport d’Electricité) and Jedlix (European Vehicle-Grid-Integration platform) to test the ability of electric vehicles to contribute to balancing electric production and demand by controlling their charging process. This experiment is part of the expected evolution of the secondary reserve market, which will open up to European competition by 2021.

The massive integration of intermittent renewable energy and the closure of traditional thermal power plants is driving the companies to look for innovative and flexible solutions to guarantee the balancing of the power system at the lowest cost.

The secondary reserve is mainly based on thermal or hydropower plants. The Renault Groupe has decided to experiment with a new alternative: controlling the charging of electric vehicles which, following a signal sent by RTE, will inject or draw electricity to help to ensure the balance between production and consumption. This is one of the services electromobility will be able to provide to the new electrical system. The objective of this experiment is to evaluate not only the technical feasibility of this new type of service, which is based on embedded connectivity of the vehicle but also its value for the power grid and ultimately for the electric vehicle owner.

‘We are very pleased to collaborate with RTE and Jedlix. This is an important step in the integration of the electric vehicle as an essential link in the energy network. In the long term, our customers who own electric vehicles will benefit from more economical and greener electricity consumption and will therefore be remunerated for the service they provide to the electricity grid,’ says Yasmine Assef, New Energy Business Program Director of Renault.

Renault has signed a partnership agreement together with RTE (Réseau de Transport d’Electricité) and Jedlix (European Vehicle-Grid-Integration platform) to test the ability of electric vehicles to contribute to balancing electric production and demand by controlling their charging process. This experiment is part of the expected evolution of the secondary reserve market, which will open up […]

Continental Mobility Study 2020: Increasing importance of private transportation during the pandemic

Key findings of the recently published Continental Mobility Study 2020 show that public transportation has gained in importance as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. In order to minimize contact with others, many people are choosing to travel in their own cars. The use of public transportation and carpools, in contrast, has declined significantly worldwide.

Within the framework of the study, representative surveys on people’s mobility habits were conducted in Germany, France, the USA, Japan and China.

In France and Germany, 80% of respondents reported having changed their daily mobility habits during the pandemic, for 81% in the USA. In China one can observe the greatest change in mobility habits with an increase of 93% for 88% in Japan.

Dr Ariane Reinhart, Continental Executive Board member for Human Relations and Sustainability, says of the study results: “The results of the Continental Mobility Study show that there is a global need for personal mobility. During the coronavirus pandemic, this demand has increased even more.” Dr Ariane Reinhart continues: “Against the backdrop of the pressing climate issue, sustainable and – first and foremost – carbon-neutral solutions for global transport are therefore all the more important. As a technology company with one of the most comprehensive sustainability roadmaps in the supplier industry, Continental is set to make key contributions in many areas related to personal transport. Our goal is carbon-neutral mobility – by 2050 at the latest.”

The coronavirus pandemic is leading to greater personal mobility and thus to a further increase in traffic density in the five countries surveyed. “Modern vehicles with predictive software onboard are now an important part of the solution to people’s mobility needs. Cars that bring their occupants safely and efficiently to their destination. Continental stands for these intelligent solutions,” says Dr Ariane Reinhart.

n addition to cars, bicycles have also received a further boost due to coronavirus pandemic. At 34 per cent, the increase in the use of bicycles is particularly high in China, followed by Germany at 21 per cent. It is a different story for public transportation, meanwhile, with half of the people in Germany saying they use public transit less often than before, and more than half in China and Japan. It is notable that 56 per cent of people in the USA and 48 per cent of people in France have made no changes in their use of buses and trains. In China, Japan and Germany, only around one-third of respondents reported likewise.

The question is whether this trend will continue after the crisis.

Overall, cars are part of daily travel for most people in all of the surveyed countries. In the USA, Germany and France, more than half of those surveyed said they use a vehicle daily or almost daily and around one-third reported driving a car at least once a week. At 43 and 41 per cent respectively, the total for China reaches a similarly high level, but with fewer daily or almost daily trips than in Western industrialized nations. Only around a third of Japanese people surveyed reported driving daily or at least once a week, with 13 per cent of respondents there stating that they forgo driving completely.

To read the original article click here.

For more information on the survey and its results, visit this website.

Key findings of the recently published Continental Mobility Study 2020 show that public transportation has gained in importance as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. In order to minimize contact with others, many people are choosing to travel in their own cars. The use of public transportation and carpools, in contrast, has declined significantly worldwide. […]

Interview series with ELVITEN’s pilot cities

ELVITEN promotes innovation, sustainability and urban mobility in Europe through demonstrating the usefulness of electrified L-category vehicles (EL-Vs) for urban transportation in six pilot cities: Bari, Berlin, Genoa, Malaga, Rome and Trikala. It aims to achieve a mind shift among users and will propose replicable usage schemes to address the issues surrounding the market deployment of EL-Vs.

To better understand the project and the challenges that emerged during the years, ELVITEN decided to interview its partner cities. In fact, the Demonstration Cities, differ in specific features (existing EL-V fleets, infrastructure, mobility problems, policies) but they all involve existing EL-Vs fleets and charging infrastructure.

 

MALAGA

Malaga was the pilot city with the most users registered, how do you explain that?

Fortunately, we have found in Malaga a very good disposition on the part of the citizenry to be a user of light electric vehicles and a lot of interest in knowing them and knowing what their benefits are.

Malaga, being a coastal city, is quite long shaped, which frequently means that the average distances travelled on regular routes are longer than in cities with a similar population. This fact makes users appreciate the advantages that this type of vehicle presents.

How has COVID-19 affected mobility in the city of Malaga?

At first, a hard confinement was decreed throughout the country of Spain and this caused all operations to halt drastically. Subsequently, upon reopening, we were able to verify that the number of trips per vehicle increased. In addition, other studies on mobility have been able to verify that the use of vehicles such as bicycles and other light electric vehicles (including light electric vehicles) have increased in use, mainly due to the fact that they present more safety against COVID-19 than public transport.

 

BERLIN

Why did COVID-19 not have a big impact in the Berlin demontrations?

During the COVID-19 lockdown the number of trips remained constant since the users preferred using the scooters instead of public transport. Since the eScooters were used more prominently for private trips, for a duration of 3 weeks there was no fear of contracting the virus; at the same time bicycles are seen as a better alternatives to using the public transport.

What was the user experience like for the Berlin demonstrations?

Since the Berlin pilot city was a station based sharing system for the eScooters, there was the possibility for more interaction with the users and collection responses first hand. The responses were very positive, since for many users it was the first time they adopted a form of eMobility; the experience show that many of the users decided to buy an eScooter.

 

TRIKALA

Trikala was the pilot city with the most users, with over 9844 trips, how do you explain that?

Trikala is a medium-sized provincial city and the capital of the Trikala regional unit in the middle of Greece. It hosts a population of approximately 61,653 inhabitants (81,355 including the suburbs and nearby villages).  Due to the small size of the urban district, only around 1/3 of the inhabitants travel within the city by bus. Citizens prefer to walk, cycle or drive, rather than use public transport, and two-wheelers are a dominant means of transport as the city is flat and the weather is mostly good throughout the year. Citizens were keen on the idea of freely using EL-Vs, since it is the best alternative to using a car and, at the same time allows them to travel longer distances. Being part of a city that also had the first autonomous driverless electric bus in Greece, they wanted to try these new vehicles.

Trikala is the pilot city with the smallest population among the ELVITEN demonstration cities, while recording the highest number of trips, what do these figures mean regarding the behaviour, wants and needs of Trikala’s citizens?

Traffic congestion is considered as one of the main problems in the city centre. The city’s topography and morphological characteristics (i.e. the river and its bridges), the mixed land uses (i.e. the commercial, residential, entertainment and institutional activities gathered in the city centre), as well as the high rates of car ownership, conjointly with the citizens’ preference to use private cars even when it is not necessary, cause severe traffic in the city centre. Therefore, many citizens want to find an alternate way of moving within the city, and EL-Vs provided this solution. It was also evident from the data that plenty of trips were made by the professional drivers, as they quickly adopted the vehicles for their trips.

 

ROME

How was the ELVITEN pilot project in Rome? How did you manage a small pilot in a such big city?

Rome is one of the biggest city in Europe. We implemented the ELVITEN project in one of the districts of Rome – Municipality IX EUR – which is as big as the city of Milan. It was the first time for a Roman district to manage such a complex project on its own without external local support while challenging the internal staff in complex and transversal tasks across different departments.

In the face of a considerable expenditure of energy that has involved sacrifices in relation to other administrative activities, the results have compensated our administration above all for the considerable skills acquired thanks to the implementation of the project.

However, the pilot project was a success in Rome as a crucial part of the policy for the sustainable mobility implemented by the Municipality during the 5 years administration by involving more than 10 bodies present in our territory in the use of the e-bikes thanks to bi-lateral agreements signed for the long-term sharing: more than 8,000 trips made for over 38,000 km travelled.

Did you encounter any problem in implementing the project?

We did encounter many issues.  Behind the management complexity for the internal staff, difficulties occurred in putting the vehicles on the road. The Le1a vehicles were matriculated for the first time in Italy thanks to the ELVITEN project, in the Cities of Rome and Bari. This turned out to be a great achievement but at the same time a puzzle with the bureaucracy as happens for the start of procedures implemented for the first time. Furthermore, e-bikes are registered as 50 Cc mopeds and thus need insurance, use of helmet and holding a driving license. On the other hand, no problem was found on the part of users regarding traffic safety during the pilot, no accidents registered. Some of the aspects reported hinder the implementation of a large-scale city bike-sharing while they can encourage a corporate bike-sharing, managed by the individual companies concerned. However, this solution would contribute to the change of transport modes from the use of ICE vehicles to sustainable vehicles, lightening traffic and decreasing air pollution, which is an important goal of the ELVITEN project.

 

GENOA – BARI – ROME

Since Italy was the first European country hit with a high number of COVID-19 cases, how did the behaviour of users in Bari, Rome and Genoa change post-lockdown?

For Bari:

During the lockdown months (March, April and first days of May) due to COVID-19 pandemic, the use of the EL-Vs decreased significantly. However, in the months of May and June, on reopening after the lockdown, the usage rate improved considerably.

More in detail, from 5th of March, all the schools and the didactic activities in Italy, including universities, were suspended. Hence, most of the professors and students of POLIBA, that used the e-bikes, stayed at home and only a few trips have been registered. Additionally, many public offices and authorities in Puglia region were closed by the Italian government to limit the spread of the virus. Smart working was imposed for all possible work and the Italian population that was forced to stay at home. These restrictions, imposed, to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus, affected negatively the number of trips in Bari with very low data for the months of March, April and for the first days of May.

After the lockdown, as mitigation actions and in order to increase the number of trips, several e-bikes were assigned to delivery companies as pizza-restaurants and bars, and to users very interested and motivated to use the e-bikes; considering also that the public transport system was not considered so safe for the virus containment, the usage of the e-bikes has become one of the main means of transport and it allowed a significant increase of the number of trips.

For Rome:

In Rome, immediately after the lockdown, we registered a consistent decrease in the number of trips, as a consequence of the initial fear of any type of travel. Immediately after however, since the end of April 2020 the possibility of using a safe vehicle for health as a e-bike, in compliance with social distancing criteria set by our Central Government to fight the COVID-19 pandemic, brought users back to bicycles, recording a very significant increase in their use, until the end of the pilot in June 2020. The e-bikes turned out to be significantly useful to avoid infections.

 

ELVITEN promotes innovation, sustainability and urban mobility in Europe through demonstrating the usefulness of electrified L-category vehicles (EL-Vs) for urban transportation in six pilot cities: Bari, Berlin, Genoa, Malaga, Rome and Trikala. It aims to achieve a mind shift among users and will propose replicable usage schemes to address the issues surrounding the market deployment […]

The ELVITEN Project in Pictures

2nd World Light Electric Vehicle Summit (22 to 23 November 2017)

PPRS 2018 (27 March 2018)

ITS World Congress (18 September 2018)

AEC 2018, Avere E-mobility Conference (18 October 2018)

ITS European Congress (4 to 5 June 2019)

7th World Collaborative Congress (18 to 19 September 2019)

Restart Mai City (27 September 2019)

STA Annual Conference and Innovation awards (26 November 2019)

ERTICO Virtual Conference (28 May 2020)

Urban Mobility Days (29 September and 2 October 2020)

ELVITEN’s final event (21 October 2020)

2nd World Light Electric Vehicle Summit (22 to 23 November 2017) PPRS 2018 (27 March 2018) ITS World Congress (18 September 2018) AEC 2018, Avere E-mobility Conference (18 October 2018) ITS European Congress (4 to 5 June 2019) 7th World Collaborative Congress (18 to 19 September 2019) Restart Mai City (27 September 2019) STA Annual […]

The achievements of the ELVITEN project

The EU funded ELVITEN project, after 36 months of intensive research work, is coming to an end. The ultimate aim of the project was to familiarise and boost the general public to the Light Electric Vehicles’ (EL-Vs) use after long-term demonstrations as well as to encourage the integration of EL-Vs in European urban transport.

More specifically, ELVITEN project offered 225 EL-Vs in six European cities – Trikala, Rome, Bari, Genoa, Malaga, Berlin – which were available to citizens through long-term or short-term rental and sharing services. Furthermore, the project developed and offered to both users and authorities, supporting ICT tools and services to facilitate and promote the EL-Vs’ use, such as Booking application, SmartCard application for collecting and cashing  points of ecological driving, fleet management, etc. The vehicles were equipped with positioning and speed recorder, while all applications were collecting data from the EL-Vs’ use and user perceptions as well.

As a result of the ELVITEN vehicles’ demonstrations from April 2019 to June 2020, a big data bank was created, including data from 41,450 trips and 8,856 questionnaires with the users’ perceptions regarding the vehicles’ use and electromobility in general. Based on these, the project partners developed business models for rental services as well as guidelines for transport and planning authorities, aiming to integrate the light electric vehicles in urban transport system, and suggestions for improvements to vehicle manufacturers. It is worthy to mention that the European project ELVITEN through a sequence of communications and dissemination actions, such as the Regional Support Groups, the Let’s Go Electric social media campaign, etc., attracted various audiences, bringing together both citizens and policy makers.

ELVITEN accomplished its initial aim for a more sustainable, clean and green transport system, confirming the environmental and economic benefits in citizens’ daily life and the society in general. The use of light electric vehicles contributes to the decrease of fuels emissions, thus in important improvement of life in urban environments. The recent pandemic situation showed the way for the development of an observatory to understand the effects of COVID pandemic to transportation system for European citizens. Summarizing the collected results, partners compiled a report with suggestions for the rental services of the EL-Vs, as occurred after the outbreak of COVID pandemic. The suggestions were developed upon the following axes:

    • Safety and  sanitation: It should be highlighted during the awareness campaigns that the light electric vehicles are open, transfer only one passenger and can be easily cleaned, contributing to social distancing;
    • Strategy: It is suggested to offer a monthly subscription for EL-Vs’ use instead of offers for a short-term use of the vehicles, in order to keep a low cost per drive for the new users;
    • Integration: The integration of technological innovations and tools (platforms, vehicles’ sharing services, etc.) for the development of sustainable mobility for all should be pursued;

Moreover, the ELVITEN light electric vehicles, were used during the COVID pandemic so as to facilitate the citizens’ life. In particular, in the city Trikala the EL-Vs were used by the municipal policy and the courier services’ companies so as to ensure the immediate service of citizens. Respectively, in Genoa, the vehicles were used for products’ delivery and health services’ provision to citizens. Taking also into consideration the fact that the city logistics are responsible for much of the fuel emissions due to the frequent stopover for the freight deliveries, it is necessary to accelerate the shift to a greener and clearer transport system.

The EU funded ELVITEN project, after 36 months of intensive research work, is coming to an end. The ultimate aim of the project was to familiarise and boost the general public to the Light Electric Vehicles’ (EL-Vs) use after long-term demonstrations as well as to encourage the integration of EL-Vs in European urban transport. More […]

The presentations and recordings of ELVITEN’s final event are available here

On 21 October, the ELVITEN project celebrated its conclusion with a final event dedicated to sustainable mobility.

If you missed the event, you can still have a look at the presentations and listen to the recordings by clicking below.

 

1- “Light electric mobility as driver for urban sustainable mobility”, presented by Alessandro Drago, City of Rome

2- “The vision and achievements of the ELVITEN project“, presented by Evangelia Portouli, ICCS

3- “The ELVITEN demonstration activities in Rome“, presented by Silvia Andreussi, from City of Rome

4- “Post ELVITEN in Action: Preparation of a plan for light electric mobility in Rome“, presented by Alessandro Rinaldi and Prof. Maria Pia Fanti from Polytechnic University of Bari

5- “Usage and acceptant of light electric vehicles in the six demonstration cities“, presented by Anna Antonakopoulou

6- “Scaled impacts on mobility and environment due to the introduction of light electric vehicles“, presented by Maria Georgakaki & Giannis Papadimitriou, EMISIA

7- “The way forward: Business models for wide market uptake of light electric vehicles“, presented by José F. Papí, S3Transportation / Etelätär Innovation

8- “The way forward: Guidelines for the wide market uptake of light electric vehicles“, presented by Cino Repetto / Elena Cosso, TBridge

On 21 October, the ELVITEN project celebrated its conclusion with a final event dedicated to sustainable mobility. If you missed the event, you can still have a look at the presentations and listen to the recordings by clicking below.   1- “Light electric mobility as driver for urban sustainable mobility”, presented by Alessandro Drago, City […]

ELVITEN final event calls for urban mobility plans that include electric mobility

ELVITEN promotes innovation, sustainability and urban mobility in Europe through demonstrating the usefulness of electrified L-category vehicles (EL-Vs) for urban transportation in six pilot cities: Bari, Berlin, Genoa, Malaga, Rome and Trikala. It aims to achieve a mind shift among users and will propose replicable usage schemes to address the issues surrounding the market deployment of EL-Vs.

The ELVITEN project is also supported by 23 Regional Support Groups, with new members ADAC and RACC.

On 21 October, the ELVITEN project celebrated its conclusion with a final event dedicated to sustainable mobility.

Overall, 644 users registered to use the service in the six pilot cities for a total of 38,866 trips. From the analysis of the data on ELVITEN vehicles’ use, it became apparent that users who did not use the vehicles on a regular basis, became with time, regular users. With the COVID-19 pandemic, pilot cities became a privileges observatory to assess changes in mobility: there was a major increase in light electric vehicle usage in the 6 demonstration cities at the end of the COVID-19 lockdown.

In addition, the scaled-up analysis revealed that there is no evidence that replacing passenger cars with electric vehicles will reduce travel times, but EL-Vs may be advantageous in terms of parking times.

When it comes to introducing EL-Vs in urban mobility, speakers stressed the need for an urban mobility plan that would include as well as electric mobility. Such an urban plan should, for instance, include a polycentric vision of charging points and a review of road infrastructure. Additionally, the study of EL-Vs acceptance showcased the important role that facilitating conditions and experience affects the acceptance of EL-Vs.

ELVITEN promotes innovation, sustainability and urban mobility in Europe through demonstrating the usefulness of electrified L-category vehicles (EL-Vs) for urban transportation in six pilot cities: Bari, Berlin, Genoa, Malaga, Rome and Trikala. It aims to achieve a mind shift among users and will propose replicable usage schemes to address the issues surrounding the market deployment […]

Final event showcases ELVITEN’s achievements

(The presentations and recordings of this event are available here).

On 21 October, the ELVITEN project celebrated its conclusion with a final event dedicated to sustainable mobility.

This event was attended by more than 200 individuals interested in the accomplishments of this project, and 8 partners coming from the different pilot cities presented the main findings of the research and elaborated on user’s behaviour regarding EL-Vs.

ELVITEN promotes innovation in sustainable urban mobility through demonstrating the usefulness of electrified L-category vehicles (EL-Vs) for urban transportation in six pilot cities: Bari, Berlin, Genoa, Malaga, Rome and Trikala.

 

Overall, 644 users registered to use the service in the six pilot cities for a total of 38,866 trips. With the COVID-19 pandemic, pilot cities became a privileged observatory to assess changes in mobility: there was a major increase in light electric vehicle usage in the 6 demonstration cities at the end of the COVID-19 lockdown period.

Silvia Andreussi, Project Manager City of Rome – IX District (RomaC), gave an overview on how the pilot project has been implemented in Rome, from the signature of the usage agreement, to the creation of and the Regional Support Group, from the collection of data to the dissemination activities. Now that ELVITEN is coming to an end, the City of Rome will continue investing in EL-Vs and will collaborate with the Polytechnic University of Bari to define a Plan for Light Electric Mobility in Rome.

Alessandro Rinaldi and Prof. Maria Pia Fanti from Polytechnic University of Bari gave a look to the future, explaining how cities could adapt for a smooth deployment of EL-Vs. In particular, a plan for EL-Vs is now necessary: public authorities are called to redesign urban space to facilitate an efficient diversification of the mobility offer and ensure the coexistence of different transport modes.

Anna Antonakopoulou, from ICCS, presented the usage and acceptance of light electric vehicles in the six demonstrations cities. In fact, she explained the collection of data which allowed the understanding of the acceptance of such vehicles from its 67 users and during 38,866 trips. Based on different figures, it proved that the users, who did not use the vehicles on a regular basis, became regular users with time.

Cino Repetto, from T-Bridge, underlined an interesting element with regards to the EL-Vs usage. During the last months of experimentation, pilot cities became a privileges observatory to understand how COVID-19 pandemic changed the mobility behaviour. The needs and habits of users have been significantly changed by this pandemic and which will have repercussions in the years to come. Jose F. Papi, from S3Transportaton, showed that there was a major increase in light electric vehicle usage in the 6 demonstration cities at the end of the COVID-19 lockdown.

Maria Georgakaki, from EMISIA, explained that when it comes to introducing EL-Vs in urban mobility, there is no evidence that replacing passenger cars with electric vehicles will reduce travel times. Additionally, the study of EL-Vs acceptance showcased the important role and influence of facilitating of usage circumstances, hedonic motivation, experience and habit towards the behavior use of EL-Vs. However, further research should be made to understand this innovation in terms of the impact that it couldh have on urban mobility

 

In order to better understand the project, you are welcome to watch the final video here.

(The presentations and recordings of this event are available here). On 21 October, the ELVITEN project celebrated its conclusion with a final event dedicated to sustainable mobility. This event was attended by more than 200 individuals interested in the accomplishments of this project, and 8 partners coming from the different pilot cities presented the main […]